Quality or Quantity… Can’t we have both?

When it comes to health & life, it seems to me that we all should be aiming to have BOTH!  The majority of my patients/clients come to me with concerns over the ‘quality’ of their life either because of painful movement or impaired movement performance (ability).  Most are not thinking, at least at the time, about their life-span (‘quantity’) and the relationship to ‘quality’.  However, we should all be planning for both!

The CDC’s definition of “Health-Related Quality of Life” (HRQOL) is “an individual’s or group’s perceived physical and mental health over time”.  Though largely a subjective term, perceived quality of life is a strong predictor of longevity.  As such, the CDC quantifies and measures HRQOL through several modules of simple questions, most of which address issues of mobility and disability.

There seems to be debate by researchers over whether there will be a decrease in the prevalence of disability as life expectancy increases (a term referred to as “compression of morbidity”) or an increase in prevalence of disability as life expectancy increases (“expansion of morbidity”).  A study led by the USC Davis School of Gerontology examined life expectancy trends and disability over a 40 year span (1970-2010).  The study found that over that time period, life span increased (men by 9.2 yrs.; women by 6.4 yrs.) yet so did years of disability (men by 4.7 yrs.; women by 3.6 yrs.).

My question is:  Does disability HAVE to increase with age?  Can we maintain independent mobility and quality of life AND increase life-span?  As a physical therapist, I think so!  But what does this entail?

TeleMovement was created to raise awareness, provide answers, and achieve BOTH quality and quantity of life.  Having easy access to scientifically-based information that can help people work toward these goals from home or work is at the heart of any good telehealth program.  Building our capacity to move efficiently, independently and productively should be our goal every day!

 

Maury Hayashida, teleMOVEMENT Clinical Consultant

Maury Hayashida graduated from Western University of Health Sciences with a Masters and Doctorate in Physical Therapy and holds dual board certification by the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) in both orthopedics (OCS) and sports (SCS) physical therapy. He is the co-founder and partner of ArthroKinetic Institute (AKI), a research-grade human movement laboratory. He is the Founder and CEO of Hayashida & Associates Physical Therapy, Inc. He is also the founder and Executive Director of the Research Institute of Human Movement (RIHM), a non-profit organization producing research and awareness for movement health and human performance. Maury has been an adjunct professor at Westmont College in the Kinesiology department since 2006 where he teaches Motor Behavior. He also serves on the medical staff for the USA National Men’s Rugby team, making regular visits to the US Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, CA for athlete assessments and touring with the team internationally.


References:

Crimmins, EM, et al. Am J of Public Health. 2016 Jul;106(7):1287-93

www.nia.nih.gov

www.cdc.gov

Maury Hayashida graduated from Western University of Health Sciences with a Masters and Doctorate in Physical Therapy and holds dual board certification by the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) in both orthopedics (OCS) and sports (SCS) physical therapy. He is the co-founder and partner of ArthroKinetic Institute (AKI), a research-grade human movement laboratory. He is the Founder and CEO of Hayashida & Associates Physical Therapy, Inc. He is also the founder and Executive Director of the Research Institute of Human Movement (RIHM), a non-profit organization producing research and awareness for movement health and human performance. Maury has been an adjunct professor at Westmont College in the Kinesiology department since 2006 where he teaches Motor Behavior. He also serves on the medical staff for the USA National Men’s Rugby team, making regular visits to the US Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, CA for athlete assessments and touring with the team internationally.

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